Vagina Monologues Opens Up Dialogue about Abuse, Sex, and Women’s Health

Each year, Salem students perform the Vagina Monologues, a series of interviews with women presented in a monologues format. Originally written by Eve Ensler in 1996, these monologues were created after interviewing hundreds of women on their ideas of sex, relationships, violence, and their vaginas. Even today, women are encouraged to not talk about their bodies. The Vagina Monologues works to to change that. They encourage open dialogue about things that are often considered socially acceptable to discuss.

    The Performance typically takes place between February 1st and April 30th in connection with the V-Day movement. V-Day is a global activist organization which opposes violence against those who identify as female. So far, it has raised more than $90

million and reached more than 300 million people.

    Salem’s production of the Vagina Monologues took place from February 6th through the 8th. Ninety percent of the proceeds from the event were donated to the Family Services Battered Women’s Shelter of Forsyth County, while the other ten percent was donated to the International V-Day Organization’s Spotlight campaign. The case consisted of students of all classes, but was headed by seniors Victoria Smith and Amanda Miller. Each of the Students performed their respective monologues incredibly well, but some spoke to me personally more than others.

    Maia Blenderman and Keren Salim’s performance of “My Vagina Was My Village,” for instance, had me almost in tears. The innocence of Maia’s voice and words compares with the harshness of Keren’s recounting of their characters’ rapes was heartbreaking.

    Seneca Sparks and Doubara Koripamo did one of this year’s special performances entitled “One Billion Will Rise,” which called people to action. It told the audience to stand up for what they believe, for what was right. Their scene ended with every person on stage raising their fists in defiance just before the stage went dark, a beautiful image to end on.

    I cannot wait for next year’s production to come around. I am even thinking of auditioning myself, but I don’t think I could hold a match to any of the performances delivered this year.

By Em Ramser

 

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